Posts by Tony Dierckins

Lakeside & Lester Park

In 1856 J. B. Bell platted a township between Fortieth and Forty-Third Avenues East from Lake Superior to today’s McCullough Street and named the town Belville after himself.The following year the Panic of 1857 brought a halt to all growth in the area, and no one ever built a permanent home in Bellville In 1871…

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Morgan Park

Those unfamiliar with the history of Morgan Park are often taken aback the first time they encounter its concrete houses. At the turn of the 20th century, U.S. Steel decided to build a steel mill in the vicinity of Duluth to save on transportation costs (its ore came from Minnesota’s Mesabi Iron Range). After Minnesota…

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Duluth Commercial Historic District

The Duluth Commercial Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, contains 107 buildings. The district consists of all Superior Street properties located between Lake Avenue and Third Avenue East, those located in the 0–100 block on the north side of West Superior Street, and properties in the 300 block on the south side…

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Duluth Landmark Properties

The following properties have been declared Duluth Landmark Properties by the City of Duluth: Duluth Public Library | 101 W. Second St. Lincoln Branch of the Duluth Public Library | 2229 W. 2nd St. Lester Park Branch of the Duluth Public Library | 106 N. 54th Ave E. Woodland Branch of the Duluth Public Library | 3732 Woodland Ave. Masonic Temple | 203 E. Superior St.…

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Duluth Properties on the National Register of Historic Places

The following Duluth properties and landmarks are on the National Park Service’s Register of Historic Places: Duluth Union Depot, 506 W. Michigan St.  | 1971 Duluth Central High School, Lake Avenue and Second Street  | 1972 Aerial Lift Bridge, Lake Avenue  | 1973 Endion Passenger Depot, Canal Park Drive  | 1975 Oliver G. Traphagen House,…

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Alworth Building

306 W. Superior Street | Architect: Daniel H. Burnham | Built: 1910 | Extant “Look Up—You Can’t Miss It,” was the slogan used to promote Duluth’s Alworth building when it first opened in in 1910. The Alworth—standing 15 stories above Superior Street and 16 above Michigan Street—was not only the tallest building in Duluth when…

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Bell & Eyster’s Bank

3 West Superior Street | Architect: George Wirth | b. 1883 | Extant The Panic of 1873, brought on by the failure of Jay Cooke’s banking house, decimated Duluth. All work stopped, and the population was slashed practically overnight. By 1877 Duluth, heavily in debt, had lost its city charter and reorganized as a village.…

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Burrows Block, aka Columbia Building

301–303 West Superior Street | Architect: McMillen & Radcliffe | Built: 1891 | Altered: 1958, 2010 Built as a five-story Romanesque Revival style retail and office complex of brick with brownstone trim, the Burrows Block was built to house Matthew S. Burrow’s Great Eastern Clothing Store, which first opened in 1886 in another location. Burrows…

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Canal Block

340 South Lake Avenue | Architect Unknown | b. 1889 Duluth’s Canal Block, better known today as the home of Green Mill Pizza, was built in 1889 by the Val Blatz Brewing of Milwaukee. The entire second floor was occupied by the Maine Hotel, and the main floor originally had 5 store fronts; one opened…

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Columbus Block

28–30 West Superior Street | Architect: Peabody & Stearns | Built: 1894 | Altered: 1908, 1955 When the three-story brick Columbus Block opened in 1894, glass and crockery sales firm F. A. Parker & Company moved in as its first tenant. William Pattison purchased the building in 1908 and added two floors that same year.…

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