Duluthians & Word War I

The World War, the most tremendous and stupendous of all modern wars, probably of all wars since history was first chronicled, found Duluth and St. Louis County practically at “attention.” Companies A, C, and E, Supply Company and Hospital Unit, all Duluth units of the Third Minnesota Infantry, Company F of Eleventh and Company M, of Hibbing, had only returned a few months before from active campaigning on the Mexican border during the time of Pershing’s expedition into Mexico. But from the moment President Wilson declared that the nation actually was (in the first days of April, 1917) in an actual “state of war” with Germany, the national guard units of Minnesota were ready for an immediate call to arms.

On April 10, 1917, companies of the Third Minnesota National Guard were called into active state service, including companies A and E of Duluth.

On April 28, 1917, the citizens of Duluth gave way to what was at that time an unique outburst of patriotic fervour, seventeen thousand three hundred citizens marching in well-marshalled procession, to “do homage to the Red, White and Blue.” It was a memorable and inspiring day, the Duluth “News-Tribune,” next morning stating: “Citizens of Duluth yesterday reached a common level before the flag. The steady tramp of marching thousands thrilled Duluth with the biggest thing in its history. It was patriotism. It was the crystalization of an ideal-that tramp of marching thousands. Its citizens, rich and poor, mingled; its streets devoted to business waved with a pulsing line of color-the Red, White and Blue.” Duluth, in common with all other communal parts of the United States, was destined to experience many even greater thrills during the next two years of united effort to adhere, even unto death, to the cause of right over might. Those who went into the armed forces of the nation, those who enlisted in the national industrial effort in the home sector, those who prayed and gave to their utmost to the governmental funds so that this country might be sustained unto victory, will ever vividly remember the stirring times; and at times may long for the renewal of such fervent patriotism, and wholesouled fellow-feeling. Common dangers uncover truer and nobler traits in man than do any other situations.

On August 26, 1917, the Duluth and Range companies of the Third Minnesota Infantry entrained at the Omaha station, Duluth, for Camp Cody, New Mexico, where the state regiment would be mustered into the federal service, and intensive training would begin.

There were many pathetic scenes at the station, women fainting and men weeping as they saw their sons depart perhaps never to return. But, as a whole, the regiment left cheered and inspirited by the warm-hearted, sincere and cheerful farewell tendered them by the people of Duluth. Colonel Eva’s “message to the home folk,” as he left with his regiment, was: “Duluth will be proud of its boys when they get into active service on the French battlefields.” They expected to be in France early in the new year.

On August 29th, rosters were published of the Third Bn. of the Minnesota Home Guard, which had been organized to take the place of the National Guard units federalized. Companies A, B, C and D, 315 men and fourteen officers, all told, constituted the third battalion, recruited almost wholly in Duluth, the commander being Captain (acting major) Roger M. Weaver. (That unit was destined to give the state good service in military capacity, in December, .1917, during the street railway strike at St. Paul.) During the first week of September, 1917, the St. Louis County draft boards were able to publish the names of men first to be called into national military or naval service under the Selective Service Act. And in that month the first detachment of men called into service from St. Louis County under that act and plan left for camp.

As the months passed and demonstration followed demonstration, the people of the county were destined to realize that their own affairs were absolutely bound in and yet secondary to the national interest which was ever before them in those days. The boys had departed, or were departing, or were to depart, to take part in the armed resistance the government and nation were building to aid in the final defeat of the enemy; and drive followed drive for the money wherewith to equip and maintain the armed forces of the nation. People gave of their substance-gave “till it hurt,” and were glad to have that opportunity of sharing in the national effort.

Each drive was an event worthy of chronicling. For instance, ten thousand persons marched in procession in Duluth on April 13, 1918, on which day the Third Liberty Loan campaign was opened, of which loan Duluth was expected to take bonds to the extent of $5,000,000.

Some of the slogans written on banners and other writing surfaces, by some of those who marched in that procession indicated the spirit and confidence of the nation. Some of the slogans read: “Slip a pill to Kaiser Bill”; “The early bird catches the worm; your bonds will help catch the kaiser”; “Save, save, save; then dig some more.

Your bonds will bring the boys back home from Europe’s western shore”; “Your dollar is the seed of victory; plant it in Liberty bonds and watch it grow”; “Ho, Skinny! My dad bought some Liberty bonds. Did yours?”; “Dig and we’ll dig with you; slack and you slack alone”; “Put up, or shut up”; “Five million or bust; Duluth has never failed”; “This is the spring drive over here, to help the spring drive over there”; and other equally appealing slogans. Practically every organized society of public character was out in full force in that procession. The local paper next day stated: “The steady tramp of marching thousands gave a new thrill to the achievement of Duluth. It was more determined enthusiasm than that displayed in the first loyalty demonstration of a year ago. It was the crystalization of an ideal to do.” Duluth and the county in general, did well. The war record is an enviable one, and whether the demand was for man-power or for money the county met it to more than the full. More than nine thousand men were taken into the federal armed forces, and many joined the auxiliary service corps, Red Cross, Y. M. C. A., and other welfare organizations. At least 232 men of St. Louis County gave their lives to the nation. It is not possible to give the space in this volume to name the whole of the valiant young men of St. Louis County who entered the armed forces of the nation in its supreme need, but space will not be stinted in an endeavor to honor the memory of those who failed to return. This chapter will end with as 629complete a biographical review as it has been possible to compile of the men who, in their supreme self-sacrifice, have constituted an honor list worthy of the county.

Fortunately, St. Louis County was destined to welcome home again all but a few hundred of the 9,000 men that went to war. And it was fitting that the “biggest and most successful celebration Duluth ever staged” was that organized to welcome home the boys who had donned the uniform of “Uncle Sam.” The “Welcome Home” celebration was held on Saturday, August 18, 1919, and “from the blowing of the whistles and the firing of the 100 guns at 10:30 o’clock Saturday morning until the bands stopped playing, for the dancers on the street, at 12:00 o’clock (midnight), the day was crowded with features for the entertainment and enjoyment of the heroes of the Zenith City.” That celebration over, the young men who for more than a year had had to give first thought to military matters, donned civilian garb and passed quietly into civil life again, the majority of them better men for their military experience. And that association will be perpetuated by the organizations the ex-service men have formed.

There are many very strong posts of the American Legion in St.

Louis County all of them resolute in determination to hold to what in reality was one of the principal motives of those good patriots who organized the American Legion-the maintaining of American institutions by orderly and legal government. In the manifestations of social and industrial unrest that followed the war, the American Legion on many occasions proved to be the stable body upon which reliance could be placed. In addition, the posts serve to cement a comradeship begun in the throes of a great national struggle.

And each American Legion post has been dedicated especially to the sacred duty of adequately honoring each year the memory of those of their comrades and neighbors who lost their lives while in war work with the national forces.

The Honor List of St. Louis County.-Of those who made the Supreme Sacrifice, it has been possible to collect some biographical data. The record is not complete, but is given in the hope that it will add something to existing printed record, and as a tribute to those brave patriots who willingly placed their personal interests second to those of the nation, and gave of their strength, even unto death, to defeat the power that sought to establish Might as Right.

F. O. Abrahamson met death in France. He belonged to the Machine Gun Company of the One Hundred and Second Regiment of Infantry, Twenty-seventh Division of the American Expeditionary Forces.

C. Albertson was twenty-six years old when he was killed in action in France in 1918. He was earnest in the cause, and had made many unsuccessful attempts to enlist before June 28, 1918, when he was accepted as a substitute for a volunteer who had been called but had failed to report for duty. Albertson left Duluth that day. The time was one of the darkest of the war and the need of man-power at the Western front was desperate. Apparently, Albertson was given practically no military training in this country for a few months later he was in France.

E. P. Alexander was a young Duluthian of distinct promise. He was born in Duluth, November 4, 1891, son of Edward’P. and Agnes G. Alexander, of Duluth. He was an engineer of good collegiate training, for as well as being a graduate of the University of Minne- 630sota he was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

He married Myra Salyards of Duluth and had entered civil engineering practice in Duluth, with bright prospects, when this nation became involved in the European war in 1917. He was one of the first to leave Duluth, going in June, 1917, to Fort Snelling, where he was given the responsibility of commissioned grade in the Engineering Corps. As a first lieutenant, he saw active service in France with the Five Hundred and Ninth Engineers. He succumbed to the ravages of influenza at St. Nazaire, France, and was there buried. His military record was good, and promotion to the grade of captain came to him on the day of his funeral.

Bryan Allen, who died in May, 1918, was a member of Battery C, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, a unit originally belonging to the Minnesota National Guard. He was the son of Leo Allen, of 315 South Fifteenth Avenue, east, Duluth.

Francis Allie, who died in France, of wound received on July 16, 1918, right at the beginning of the great Allied counter-offensive, which did not end until the enemy went down in final defeat, in November, 1918. He was well-known in West Duluth and was assigned to, and saw active service with, the Machine Gun Company of the One Hundred and Fifty-first Field Artillery, Battery B.

Alfred J. Anderson enlisted from Duluth. His sister is Mrs. D. Lake, of 1308 East Fifth Street.

Dr. John Andres practiced his profession in Duluth before entering the Medical Department of the United States army.

Robert Arbelus, whose place of enlistment was Ely, is survived by a sister, Mrs. Minnie Retois, now resident in Iron Belt, Wisconsin.

Hillard Aronson belonged to a well-known Tower family. He was born in Tower, son of John and Beda Aronson, and was in lucrative business with his brother, as boat owners on Lake Vermilion.

He registered early in 1917, but was not called into military service until June 24, 1918, on which day he reported at Ely for duty, as a private in the Infantry of the National Army. He was assigned to Company C, Three Hundred and Thirty-third Machine Gun Battalion, Eighty-sixth Division, at Camp Grant, Rockford, Illinois, and after an intensive course of machine-gun training was transferred to Camp Mills, New York. On September 14, 1918, he embarked on the British troopship “Olympic,” and on September 20th, arriver at Southampton.

Conditions of sea-travel in that time of shipping scarcity were rigorous, the troopships being much overcrowded. Young Aronson contracted sickness on the voyage and eight days after being landed at Southampton died of Lobar Pneumonia at Shirley Warren Hospital, Southampton, England. His body was interred in the United States Military Cemetery, Magdalen Hill, Winchester, England, on September 29, 1918, but eventually the body was disinterred and brought back to the United States by the government. His remains now rest in Forest Hill Cemetery, Duluth, the funeral taking place, with military ceremonies, on June 3, 1920.

Mike F. Bagley is claimed as a Duluthian. He was a married man and his widow, Alice, still lives at 318 West Fourth Street, Duluth.

Lorenta Bakke, whose name is in the Duluth records, resided at 3614 West Fourth Street, Duluth, prior to enlistment. His father, Ulrik B., lives in Bergen, Norway.

Glenn J. Ball, who was killed in action on September 5, 1918, on the French front, was a machinist in the employ of the South 631Shore Railway Company, at Duluth, prior to entering upon military service. He was enlisted in June, 1917, at Marquette, Michigan, of which state he was a native, having been born October 20, 1899, at Peck, Michigan, son of Edward and Abbie Ball. After enlistment, in the grade of private, he was assigned to Company G, 128th Infantry, of Thirty-second Division, and sent to Camp Arthur, Texas, where for five or six months he remained. On February 8, 1918, he embarked, at Hoboken, New Jersey, and thus reached France before the great German offensive of 1918 had begun. His father now lives in St. Louis County, Rural Route No. 3, Duluth.

Alexius Rinhild Bang, who died of pneumonia, at Camp Cody, New Mexico, November 3, 1918, was formerly a resident in Culver Township. He was born on February 28, 1897, at Fielboberg, Vilhelminy Wisterbotten, Sweden, the son of E. F. Bang, now of Culver, St. Louis County. Young Bang was called to duty on October 21, 1918, and left then for Camp Cody, New Mexico. He was never destined to be assigned to a military unit, being stricken with influenza almost upon arrival at Camp Cody. Pneumonia developed and he died on November 3rd.

Chris. W. Baumgarten was of Duluth, where his mother, Mrs.

Augustine Baumgarten lives.

Norman K. Bawks was a resident of Stevenson, Minnesota, where his widow, Alphonsine O., still lives.

Eli Belich was of Servian origin, his father being Waso Belich, of Labon, Servia.

Howard L(ewis) Bennett was a popular young resident of Buhl, and before the war was in the employ of the Oliver Iron Mining Company, Buhl, as assistant engineer. He was born on October 4, 1894, at Ironwood, Michigan, son of William H. Bennett, who has lived in Buhl, St. Louis County, for many years. Howard was one of the first in the Range country to enlist. He enlisted on May 23, 1917, and was sent to Fort Snelling, Minnesota, where he was assigned to the Medical Detachment of the First Minnesota Infantry. Later, he was sent to Camp Cody, New Mexico, about that time being transferred to the One Hundred and Thirty-fifth Regiment, a unit of the Thirty-fourth Division. He succumbed to pneumonia at Camp Cody, on April 14, 1918, at that time having the rating of private, first-class. To honor his memory his service comrades of Buhl gave his name to the Buhl post of the American Legion.

Harold Berg, whose name appears on the Honor Roll of St.

Louis County, was of Norwegian birth, and lived at Proctor for some time prior to enlisting. His enlistment papers name as his father Lavritz Berg, of Lena, Ototen, Norway.

William E. Berg, son of Charles Berg, of 401 Mygatt Avenue, Duluth, was in the employ of the Rust-Parker Company, Duluth, before he entered the United States Army. He was called to active duty in June, 1918, and assigned to Company C, of the Three Hundred and Fifty-eighth Infantry. His training was short, for on July 4th his regiment embarked for France. On September 16th, 1918, he was killed in action.

Rada Besonovich lived at Buhl before the war. His brother is John Besonovich, of that place.

William Bodin was the son of Gust Bodin, of Proctor.

Herman Bjormhang, of Proctor, was kin to Paul Hendrickson, Grand Marais, Minnesota.

Alfred John Bradford was a married man, his widow, Mrs. M. C. Bradford living at 1011 East Third Street, Duluth.

Carl Bowman, who was killed in aerial combat in France on July 25, 1918, was a native of Seattle, Washington, although he was in business in Duluth when war came. He enlisted at Duluth in June, 1917, being accepted for assignment to the Aviation Corps. He became an observer, and was early sent to France.

Solem Eric Broman, who was killed in action on the French front on September 29, 1918, was one of those true defenders of liberty who sought to enter the fight before the United States Government was prepared to accept service. He was a resident of Duluth, but early in March, 1917, went into Canada, and enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. On March 16, 1917, he was assigned to the Two Hundred and Forty-ninth Overseas Battalion. He saw five months of hard service in the front trenches in France before meeting death in action in September, 1918. The military record of the Broman family is a worthy one, two other brothers having given military service, one in the Canadian forces. Henry Broman, the father, lives at 232 Mesaba Avenue, Duluth.

Leo Arthur Brooks is listed as of Crookson residence prior to entering the service, but he might have been included with the honor men of Duluth, for he enlisted from Duluth, and had had residence in Duluth, living with his sister, Mrs. Leslie Code, 5107 Colorado Street, and working as a fireman in Duluth. He was born on December 11, 1886, at Hungerford, Michigan, son of Mr. and Mrs.

A. Brooks. When he enlisted he was more than thirty years old, and proved to be a most zealous and reliable soldier. After enlistment, he was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., and assigned to Company K of the Fifty-third United States Infantry. He embarked at New York in July and reached the front line trenches in the Vosges Mountains, on September 6th. He was killed during a trench raid night of September 15-16th, and his conduct during that raid was such as to bring him commendation from his commanding officer, Capt. R. A. Helmbold, who wrote that Brooks continued to fight after being wounded, the captain stating that he had lost, in Brooks, “one of his bravest and best soldiers.” He testified that Brooks kept his automatic rifle going until he was relieved, notwithstanding that he was mortally wounded; and he was of the opinion that it was due chiefly to the bravery and reliability of Brooks that the German raid was repelled.

Wallace Orab Brown, who was gassed in the 1918 battle of the Marne, and died in hospital in France on October 17, 1918, was born on June 23, 1901, at Kennan, Price County, Wisconsin. His father, John Brown, lives at Woodland and Wallace for a while was a brickmaker at Princeton, Minnesota, at which place he enlisted on August 27, 1917, electing to give service in a field artillery unit.

He was sent to Camp Cody, New Mexico, and assigned to Company B, One Hundred and Second Field Artillery, eventually embarking for France.

Peter Bruno, of West Duluth, was of Italian origin, his father being Antonio Bruno, of Goddisca, Udine, Italy.

Charles C. Butler, of Virginia, gave his life voluntarily in a brave, self-sacrificing service to his division. He enlisted November 23, 1917, in the Tank Corps, which eventually became part of the American Expeditionary Forces; and his division came into action at one of the most difficult parts of the Hindenburg line of trenches, 633at Bony, France. Butler, the record states, volunteered to lay out black and white tape for tanks, one report stating that he was the only man of his division to volunteer for such work of extreme danger.

He was killed while so engaged, a shell closing his career, and bringing his name onto the immortal roll of worthy American soldiers, who exceeded their duties in an endeavor to better serve their country. Butler was well-known and esteemed in Virginia, where his mother, Mrs. C. C. Butler, lives. He was born at Iron Mountain, Michigan, on November 15, 1889.

Charles A. Campbell, who died of pneumonia in France, just one day before the Armistice ended hostilities in November, 1918, was a volunteer above the draft age. He enlisted in the lowest grade and by reliable service reached the responsibility of a sergeant. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Campbell, of 1511 East Third Street, Duluth.

John William Campbell, of the Marine Corps, A. E. F., died of bronco-pneumonia at Coblez, Germany, on February 9, 1919. He was born May 20, 1890, at Calumet, Michigan, and was called to military service in April, 1918.

Oscar C. Carlson, of Duluth, was the son of Mrs. Mary Carlson, of East Fifth Street, Duluth.

Leonard William Cato, of Duluth, was enlisted in September, 1917, and became a member of an Infantry regiment of the famous Rainbow Division. He, however, was not destined to see foreign service, death coming on December 6, 1917, at Camp Dodge, Iowa, from spinal menengitis. He was a native of Duluth, born in that city on January 24, 1896 (or 1897), son of Louis Cato, who now lives at 2131 Columbia Avenue.

Ole H. Christenson, whose papers show that he was a resident of Harding, St. Louis County, was the son of Mrs. Gunhild Christenson, of 508 W. Superior Street, Duluth. He died of pneumonia, at Camp Fremont, California, where he was stationed. He was a lieutenant of the One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Depot Brigade, and his body was sent under military escort to Duluth for burial in the Forest Hill Cemetery.

John Christopher, of Duluth, deserves good place among the Honor men of St. Louis County. He was a veteran of the Spanish- American War, and notwithstanding that he was forty-three years old, and could not get into the United States Army, which under the Selective Service plan was amply filled by much younger men, he was determined to find a place in the military forces arrayed against the German machine. He went to Canada, and at once was accepted for the Canadian Expeditionary Forces, and assigned to an infantry unit. He was killed in action in France on September 27, 1918. He was mourned by many in Duluth, having for years been an employee of the Scott-Graff Lumber Company. His mother, Mrs. Mary Christopher, lives at 321 East Fifth Street, Duluth.

Raulin H. Clark, a Duluth boy, was one of the first to enlist in May, 1917. He was assigned to the Medical Detachment of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, and went to France with that unit. After passing through all the dangers that came to his unit during the period of active fighting, he was destined to die of sickness, pneumonia necessitating his transfer to a hospital in Bordeaux, France, almost on the eve of the departure of his unit for home. He died in that hospital on January 21, 1919, but eventually his body was returned to the United States, and now rests in 634Oneota Cemetery. He was born on January 31, 1898, at Willow River, Minnesota, and the family later came to Duluth, his mother, Mrs. E. Clark, now living at 5809 Cody Street. The boy graduated from Denfield High School in 1916, and was well under the draft age when he enlisted.

Mark Allen Cook lived in Cotton Township, his mother being Mrs. Allen Cook, of Cotton.

Alexander Cosgrove, who was a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces and was killed in action in France, was a Duluthian.

Walter Crellin, the first Virginia boy in United States uniform to give his life, was on board the British liner “Tuscania” when it was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland on February 5, 1918. *His body was recovered and buried at Kilnaughton, Islay, Scotland, but in due time was disinterred and brought back to America, so that it might have honored place in the Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington. Interment there took place on October 22, 1920. Young Crellin was well-known in both Eveleth and Virginia. He was born on August 15, 1895, at Ishpeming, Michigan, the son of Captain John S. Crellin, a mine manager, who later came to Virginia, and latterly has been of Leonidas Location, Eveleth. Walter attended the Virginia schools, eventually, in 1914, graduating from the Virginia High School. In October, 1917, he enlisted in the Aviation Section, Signal Corps.

Frank M. Cullen, whose name is on the Duluth Honor Roll, has a sister living in West Duluth, Mrs. Minnie Gilbert, of 20 Fiftythird Avenue.

Benjamin Dachyk, of Duluth, was killed by a falling tree not far from the front-line trenches in France, on July 22, 1918. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dachyk, of Greysolon Farms, near Duluth, and he enlisted at Duluth, in June, 1917, being then assigned to Company A of the Third Minnesota Regiment. Later, he was transferred to the Eighth Company, Third Motor Mechanic Corps, Air Service.

Charles Daniels, whose father, Alphonse Daniels, lives in Buyck, St. Louis County, was a Belgian by birth, born at Berges, Belgium, May 23, 1896. The family came to St. Louis County in 1910, and took up the cultivation of an acreage of wild land in Buyck township.

Charles was inducted on June 5, 1917, when he became a private of infantry, National Guard. He was assigned to Company I, One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Infantry, and in due time crossed the sea to the French front. He was killed in action on the Argonne front on October 16, 1918.

Rocco Decenzo, who was in the employ of the Republic Iron and Steel Company, Gilbert, before entering military service, was born at Sagliono, Italy, the son of Victoriano Decenzo, of that place.

He was inducted on May 24, 1918, at Eveleth, Minn., in the grade of private of infantry of National Army. He was assigned to the Thirty-Fourth Company, Ninth Battalion, One Hundred and Sixty- Sixth Depot Brigade, soon after arrival at Camp Lewis, Wash., and later became a member of Company H, One Hundred and Fifty- Seventh Infantry, Fortieth Division. With that unit he embarked from New York, on August 8, 1918. His regiment was soon in action, and he received wounds from which he died. His body was interred in the American Cemetery, Commune of Brieyeaux, Meuse, France, on October 3, 1918.

James T. Doherty, who, like his father of same name, was well-known and popular in Buhl, Minn., where he was in the employ of the Dower Lumber Company, was born at Grand Rapids, on September 17, 1893. Inducted December 16, 1917, at Chisholm, he was destined to see strenuous service in France, and to safely pass through many major offensives, including St. Mihiel, and Meuse- Argonne. He also saw severe fighting on the Champagne front, and in a Verdun sector. A month or so after the Armistice he was taken sick, tubercular trouble keeping him in Base Hospital No. 52, Remaucourt, France, from December 15, 1918 to March 26, 1919. He was only partially convalescent when he left France in May, 1919, on the troopship “DeKalb.” He succumbed to lobar-pneumonia during the voyage. His military service included six months of training at the Presidio of San Francisco. On June 24, 1918, he was transferred to Company B, Army Artillery Park, First Army, and embarked July 1st at Hoboken, for Bordeaux.

Frank Donatello, who was in the employ of the Oliver Iron Mining Company, at Hibbing, was inducted on June 28, 1918, at Duluth, and assigned in the grade of private to the Engineers National Army. He was born on June 4, 1886, at Barron, Wisconsin, and died of disease in France on November 25, 1918. His father, San Donatello, lived at Cumberland, Wisconsin.

Joseph Dragich’s death, on May 1, 1918, at a Texas camp, was attributed to the effects of pneumonia. He was one of the most eager volunteers of the early days of the war, enlisting in May, 1917.

He was an Austrian by birth, born October 17, 1888, at Tarvi, Austria, son of Nicholas Dragich, now of Chisholm.

Laurence P. Drohan, of West Duluth, left Duluth on April 26, 1917, and was early in France. He was killed in action on October 5, 1918. His mother, Mrs. Mary Drohan, lives at 9 Sixteenth Avenue, West, Duluth.

Arthur J. Duggen, whose mother, Minnie Duggen, lives in Bradford, Pennsylvania, had residence in Ely before enlisting.

Dr. Harry Dunlop, who died of wounds on November 2, 1918, was at one time in active practice in Duluth, associated with Dr.

David Graham, of West Duluth. In 1912 he went to Peru, but the outbreak of the war in 1914 drew him to Canada, where, in 1914, he enlisted in the Canadian Army. He was commissioned and assigned to the Medical Department, and sent overseas. Eventually he became captain, and passed through the long, dark, and dangerous years of vigil with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces, his death coming only nine days before the Armistice ended the strain. A brother of Dr. Dunlop lives in Duluth, and has reason to be satisfied with the part taken by his family in the struggle for the Great Cause.

Four of the family were in war service, three brothers and one sister.

Napoleon Duprey, a Duluthian who was killed in action in France, was born at Rib Lake, Taylor County, Wisconsin, on April 6, 1901, but lived for years in Duluth prior to entering service on November 3, 1917, as a private of infantry of the regular army. He was sent to Jefferson Barracks, and later to Camp Green, S. C., and embarked at New York on March 3, 1918, as a member of Company E. Thirty-Eighth Infantry, A. E. F. He was killed in action on July 15, 1918, in the Commune of Courtemont, Varennes, France.

His mother, Celia Duprey, lives at 1932 West Michigan Street, Duluth.

636Clarence E. Ellison was a Saginaw, Minnesota, boy, son of Elias Ellison, of that place.

Albert A. Erickson is claimed to have been a Duluthian; his brother, John G., lives in Cumberland, Wisconsin.

Edgar Eubanks, who was killed in action in France in October, 1918, and who prior to entering service lived in St. Louis County, was born in 1897 in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, where his parents still live. He was called to service in 1917, and assigned to the Machine Gun Company, Third Wisconsin Regiment, which eventually became a unit of the A. E. F.

John Fairgrieve, Jr., was well-known in Duluth. Until he was called into service on October 21, 1918, he was a salesman for the Knudson Fruit Company, of Duluth. He was born on November 26, 1893, in Galashiels, Scotland, the son of John and Margaret Fairgrieve.

After enlistment, he was sent to Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico, and there assigned to Company E, Three Hundred and’ Eighty-Eighth Infantry. He, however, was taken sick soon after arrival, and died in Deming, New Mexico, November 5, 1918. He was a married man, his widow, Edith (Hamilton) Fairgrieve still living in Duluth.

Guy Raymond Forbes, who died in France, was a volunteer much over draft age. He was born January 29, 1879, at Grand Rapids, Michigan. He enlisted on May 13, 1917, his technical experience causing him to elect to join an Engineer Service Battalion, with which he went to France. He died of cerebral hemorrage, near Toul, France, on May 5, 1918. His widow, Grace, now lives in Minneapolis.

Frank Leo Fox, a Duluthian killed in action in France, was the son of Michael Fox, of 213 North Fifty-Third Avenue, Duluth.

Frank enlisted in Duluth April 26, 1918, and soon went overseas.

Mozart Fredland was known to very many business men of Duluth. He was a barber in the Wolvin Building, Duluth, for some time before returning to his former home, Madison, Wisconsin, in May, 1918, to take military service. He was sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, and there died of influenza on October 10, 1918.

Leland Chester Giddings, who was killed in an aeroplane accident at Scott Field, Belleville, Illinois, on July 11, 1918, was a native of Duluth, born in that city on January 27, 1896, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Giddings, of 19 East Victoria Street, Duluth. He was one of the early volunteers, enlisting in the aviation branch of the U. S. Army on May 3, 1917.

Walter Glockner, of Grand Forks, went with a Duluth quota to Camp Dodge, and eventually reached France. He was killed in action on August 2, 1918.

Cornelius Bertram and Frederick Norbert Goodspeed, brothers, were the sons of Alvin and Rose M. Goodspeed, of Kinney. Both boys were born in Virginia, Minn., Cornelius on February 15, 1898, and Frederick on November 10, 1899; and both were educated in the local schools. Cornelius was a brakeman at Kinney before entering the army, and Frederick was a locomotive fireman for the Swallow and Hopkins Mining Company, at the same place. The elder brother was called to military service in April, 1918, and sent to Camp Dodge, Des Moines, Iowa, to join a Regular Army infantry regiment. He became a member of Company C, Twentieth Infantry, Tenth Division, and was stationed at Fort Douglas, Utah, for a period, and later at Fort Riley, Kansas. He was appointed corporal on September 1, 1918, and probably considered himself unfortunate Vol. 11-9 637in having to pass the whole of his service at a home station. He contracted scarlet fever at Fort Riley early in 1919, and died there on February 2d. His younger brother, Frederick Norbert, enlisted on May 6, 1917, at Virginia, as a private, and left without delay for Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas, where he was assigned to the Headquarters Company of the Sixteenth Regiment, First Division. He was only at Fort Bliss for one month, leaving in June, 1917, for Port of Embarkation. He sailed from Hoboken on the “Havana,” on June 14, 1917, and arrived safely at St. Nazaire, France, on June 25th, being thus with one of the first American units to set foot in France. The regiment remained in the Gondrescourt Area until October 20, 1917, and was in action on October 21, 1917, in the sector north of Canal de Parroy. Later, the regiment was in action at Cantigny, Soissons, St. Mihiel, and Argonne. For gallantry in action, young Goodspeed was cited on one occasion by his brigade commander, Brigadier-General Parker. Finally, the brave boy was killed in action, in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, on October 4, 1918.

Henry Patrick Gowan was an enterprising business man of Duluth, member of the firm of Gowan-Lenning-Brown Company, wholesale grocers of Duluth. His sister, Mrs. Mary Dacey, lives at 1621 East Fourth Street, Duluth.

John Graden, nephew of Charles Sandgren, 2901 West Third Street, Duluth, was thirty-two years old when he enlisted. In prior civil life he was an employee of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway Co., Bridge and Building Department, at Duluth Docks.

He went overseas, and died of pneumonia in France on October 9, 1918.

Charles H. Gordon, who lived at Proctor, was the son of Mrs. Katherine T. Graves, 534 West Second Street, Duluth.

Elmer L. Griffen, who was inducted at Duluth, was formerly a resident of Solon Springs. He reported for military duty at Duluth on July 25, 1918, being enlisted as private of infantry, and sent to Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina. There he was assigned to Headquarters Company, Three Hundred and Twenty-third Infantry, and with that regiment eventually crossed the seas. He died of pneumonia, in France, on October 8, 1918. His sister, Mrs. Bessie Mosher, now lives at 313 Morgan Park Street, Duluth.

Herman Gulbranson, who was wounded in action on the Vesle River front, August 1, 1918, and died a week later in hospital, was a native of St. Louis County, born at Hermanstown, February 2, 1896, son of Peter and Hilma Gulbranson. Before entering the service he was in the employ of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway Company at Proctor. He enlisted on September 22, 1917, at Duluth, and left for Camp Dodge, Iowa, where he was assigned to Company B, Three Hundred and Fifty-Second Infantry. About a month later he was transferred to Camp Cody, New Mexico, and there remained until June 16, 1918, when his unit was ordered to Port of Embarkation.

The regiment was at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, for a week, and sailed on June 28th, at a time when the call for man-power was most urgent, and the outlook darkest. Soon after reaching France, the regiment moved to a front area.

Alfred Israel Gustafson, who lived at Chisholm for some time before enlisting, was born in Eveleth, son of Fred Gustafson, now of Cook, St. Louis County. Date of birth, May 29, 1896. He entered the service on May 25, 1918, as private of infantry, and was assigned to Company I, of One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Infantry, Fifth 638Army Corps. He was killed in action in France on October 21, 1918.

Charles R. Gustafson, of Duluth, elected to give service in one of the most dangerous branches of the army, the Air Service. He was early in France, and as a lieutenant of the Twenty-Fifth Aero Squad, Fourth Pursuit Corps, was on the French front during the early days of the German drive of 1918. He was killed in action on April 9, 1918.

John Gustafson was a farmer at Angora prior to enlisting.

Robert H. Gustafson was of Duluth; his step-mother, Mrs. Mary Johnson, lives at 430 West Fifth Avenue.

William August Gustafson is on the Hibbing roll, his mother, Ida Gustafson, still living there.

Edward Cornelius Hagar, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Hagar, of 814 Third Avenue, east, Duluth, was killed at sea on September 29, 1918.

He had enlisted in the United States Navy, and was one of the ship’s company of the U. S. transport “Ohioan.” Death came from fracturing of skull and other injuries sustained by mishap encountered in launching a lifeboat.

Earl F. Haire is on the Honor Roll, but no biographical or service records are available from which his life and army service might be reviewed.

Theodore George Hall, son of George Hall, of 3124 Chestnut Street, Duluth, served in the army for twenty-two months and was in action in most of the major offensives and defensives from Chateau Thierry to the end. He was born on February 19, 1900, at Erie, North Dakota, son of George and Ida Ayers Hall. He was at heart a soldier and took keen interest in the functioning of the Minnesota National Guard. He was a member of Company C, Minnesota National Guard, and with that unit served on the Mexican border in 1916. Not many months after he had returned from the border, he enlisted for World War service. On July 15, 1917, he was assigned to Company C, Third Minnesota Infantry, which federalized became part of the Thirty-Fourth Division. From August, 1917, to June, 1918, the regiment was at Camp Cody, New Mexico. In June, 1918, young Hall was transferred, at Camp Cody, to the June Automatic Replacement Draft, and later to the Third Trench Mortar Battery, Third Artillery Brigade, Third Division, A. E. F. He sailed for France in the “Justicia,” in the latter part of June, 1918, and upon arrival went almost immediately to the front. He saw fighting in most of the major offensives from Chateau Thierry to the end, being present at Chateau Thierry, Verdun, St. Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne.

After the Armistice, his division became part of the Army of Occupation, and marched to the Rhine. He was stationed at Mayen, Germany, until he died. Death came, after only one day of illness, on the last day of 1918, the sickness being diagnosed as lobar-pneumonia.

Eventually, the body was disinterred, and brought back to this country, and to Duluth. Funeral services were held at Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, Duluth, on October 19, 1920, on which day his remains were laid finally in Oneota Cemetery with military honors, the ceremony being conducted under the auspices of the local post of the American Legion.

Carl Hansen, who was killed in action at the Meuse River, France, on October 31, 1918, was a well-known West Duluth musician.

He was born on February 8, 1889, in Skrup, Sweden, where his mother still lives, although he had other relatives in Minnesota, a sister, Mrs. O. O. Woods, living at Hopper, Minn. Carl was 639called into military service on April 26, 1918, and assigned to an infantry regiment, crossing the sea without much delay, being killed in action within six months of enlistment, almost.

Herbert Constantius Hansen, son of Thor and Atlanta Hansen, of Duluth, was born May 23, 1898, at Kennsett, North County, Iowa.

He was a machinist by trade, and before entering the navy was employed at his trade at the Clyde Iron Works, Duluth. He was called to active duty on August 10, 1918, at Duluth, and was sent for training to the Great Lakes Naval Station. There he died of pneumonia on September 24, 1918.

Peter Hansen’s endeavor to be of some use to his country in the time of need is obvious in his bare record. He was a cripple even before enlisting, a hunting accident injuring his spine. He was in a wheel chair when enlisted in September, 1917. He was a skillful radio operator, and asked to be assigned to such work at a home station, so as to relieve one physically fit man for everseas work. He served for more than a year, dying eventually of pneumonia, in October, 1918, at the Marine Hospital, Chicago. He was born on March 9, 1897, at Biwabik, the son of Peter and Jennie Hansen, now of Chisholm.

Bernard C. Hanford was a member of Company B, Fifteenth Machine Gun Battalion.

Thomas Hammer, who lived in Duluth for some time prior to enlistment, was killed in action in the Argonne offensive on October 7, 1918.

Jack Hanford, a lieutenant who died in a French hospital on August 8, 1918, of wounds received nine days earlier, was a native of Duluth, born in the city in 1897. His father, Harry C. Hanford, now lives at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but for many years lived in Duluth, being at one time agent for a coal company of that place. He lived on Third Avenue, near Eleventh Avenue, east. Therefore Lieutenant Jack Hanford may rightly be placed on the Duluth Honor Roll.

About Thor Harris, who made the supreme sacrifice, there is no information available.

Arthur James Hayes, a native Duluthian, who died of pneumonia in a home camp within a few months of enlistment, was a young writer of promise. He was born in Duluth on October 1, 1894, the son of James J. and Margaret A. Hayes, now of Chisholm, and was given a good education, becoming eventually a college graduate. He took to literary pursuits, and gave indications of marked adaptability to that profession. He reported for military duty at Duluth in February, 1918, and was assigned to the Thirty- Sixth Engineers at Camp Grant, Illinois. There, on April 16th following, he died.

Edward Hedenburg, of Duluth, was one of four sons of A. Hedenberg, of 4525 Peabody Street, Duluth, to give service. He enlisted in October, or November, 1917, in the Ordnance Department, U. S.

Army, and saw service in France with the Supply Division of Ordnance.

Returning to this country, he was detained in a New York hospital, where he died in June, or July of 1919, of pneumonia.

Earl B. Herbert, who lived at 217 Second Avenue, west, Duluth, before enlisting, seems to have had no other relatives in St. Louis County. His mother lives at Menominee, Michigan.

George Heber is claimed by Hibbing, his mother, Margaret Heber, living there.

640Michael Hesdal was of Duluth, although his parents still live in Norway. His father is Mons Hesdal, of Lillebergen, Bergen, Norway.

John E. Higgins, also of Duluth, died in October, 1918. He was a private in Casual Company No. 397. Beneficiaries of his estate are Helen and Della Bridget Higgins.

Arvid I. Hill, who died while crossing the sea to the War Zone, was a Virginia boy, born in that city on February 24, 1896. His father, Isaac Hill, lives in Embarrass, St. Louis County. Young Hill was called to duty on June 24, 1918, and assigned to Ambulance Company No. 341, Three Hundred and Eleventh Sanitary Train, Eighty-Sixth Division. He had the grade of wagoner, and died during the voyage to Europe. His body was buried at Liverpool, England, on October 4, 1918.

Joseph Horovitz was a Duluth boy, son of Mrs. Lottie Horovitz, of 320 East First Street. He died of influenza in France.

Axel M. Howalt, son of Louis Howalt, of Park Point, Duluth, was a sergeant of Battery B, One Hundred and Fifty-first Field Artillery, Rainbow Division. He was twice in hospital, being gassed ‘on May 27, 1918, and severely wounded in the July fighting. He died in hospital in July-August, 1918.

Joseph Hurovitch, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hurovitch, of 320 East First Street, Duluth, was employed’ in the linen department of George A. Gray and Co.’s Duluth store before entering the army.

He became a corporal, and acting sergeant of Headquarters Company, Three Hundred and Forty-Eighth Infantry, A. E. F. He died of bronco-pneumonia, in France, on October 25, 1918.

Frank Fred Indihar was of the prominent Gilbert family of that name. He was born at Biwabik, September 12, 1896, and passed most of his life in Biwabik and Gilbert. He was the son of Frank and Meri Indihar, and latterly was a clerk in his father’s store at Gilbert.

He enlisted in August, 1917, being assigned to an infantry regiment, which eventually was sent to France, He was killed by shrapnel on September 26, 1918, in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. His brother is village clerk of Gilbert.

Fred Jackson, of Tower, was a son of William R. Jackson, of that place.

John Alfred Jacobson, of Virginia, was born at Messabe, St.

Louis County, son of August Jacobson, now of Virginia. He was in an infantry regiment, and was killed in action in France, being mortally wounded by bayonet.

Edward Jarvi was of Duluth residence; his brother, Nerst Jarvi, now lives in Hibbing.

Alfred Johnson, who was born on June 16, 1891, was the son of Christ Johnson, of Duluth. Alfred died of wounds in a base hospital in France.

Arnold Walter Johnson, whose name is on the Duluth list, was a son of Mrs. Nellie Johnson, Virginia.

Axel W. Johnson lived at 1331 West First Street, Duluth, prior to enlistment. His nearest relative is given as Miss Jennie Helbert, an aunt, of Kansas City, Missouri.

Carl W. Johnson, who went from Duluth, was the son of Charles E. Johnson, 2085 Sixty-Seventh Avenue, West, Duluth.

Cecil A. Johnson lived at Proctor. His widow, Effie, now lives at Bayfield, Wisconsin.

641Conrad Gilbert Johnson was a native of Duluth, and a promising student at the University of Minnesota when war came. He was born in Duluth on November 25, 1896, the son of Otto and Christina Johnson, now of 2615 West Third Street, Duluth. He attended local schools, and eventually entered the University of Minnesota.

On April 17, 1917, he enlisted at Minneapolis, as a candidate-officer, and was sent to the First Officers’ Training School at Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Successfully passing examinations at the close of the course of training, he was accepted into the Air Service of the United States Army, which meant that he was as nearly physically perfect as was possible, the physical test of the aviation branch of the U. S.

forces being the most rigid. He was assigned to the Princeton School of Aeronautics in July, 1917, and remained there until September.

On September 25, 1917, he embarked, as a cadet, on the liner “Saxonia,” at New York, safely reaching England, where for long he was in training. Crossing to France eventually, he went into action, and saw dangerous exciting service at the front. He was killed in action on October 23, 1918, during the last six months of service holding the rank of first lieutenant.

Frank F. Johnson, of Duluth, was called into service on June 28, 1918, and assigned to an infantry unit at Camp Grant where he did not remain for more than a month. On November 5, 1918, he died of wounds received in action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. His mother is Mrs. Bertha Johnson, of 21 South Sixty-Sixth Avenue, West, Duluth.

Fritz Johnson, of Duluth, was a nephew of Thor Hanson, 2415 West Sixth Street, Duluth.

Harry E. Johnson was the son of John A. Johnson, of 125 North Sixty-First Avenue, West, Duluth.

Johan A. Johnson, who lived in Chisholm before going into military service, appears to have no relatives in St. Louis County.

His sister, Esther, lives in Pittsburg.

John Johnson, whose mother now lives in Eveleth, was born on July 11, 1896, at Wasa, Finland, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Johnson.

He was enlisted into the infantry branch of the National Army in July, 1918, and was ordered to Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico.

There he was assigned to Casual Company No. 4, of the Three Hundred and Eighty-Eighth Infantry. He died of pneumonia in that camp on November 6, 1918.

Leonard Johnson, of Duluth, was a nephew of Mrs. Sardra Willis, 104 South Forty-Eighth Avenue, West, Duluth.

Robert M. Johnson, of Duluth, lived at 2112 West Third Street before enlistment.

Anthony Kaelis lived at 1022 West Superior Street.

John E. Kalahar lived in Hibbing, his widow, Viola C., still living there.

David Kaplan had lived in Duluth for about ten years before entering upon military duties, but he was born in Russia. He was killed in action in France on October 4, 1918.

Dan D. Katoski, who before entering upon military duty was a teamster in the employ of J. H. Clough, contractor of Duluth, was born in August, 1890, at Ragrot, Poland. He was enlisted, as private in infantry of the Regular Army, on July 24, 1918, at Duluth, and sent to Camp Wadsworth, Spartansburg, South Carolina, where on July 28th he was assigned to Company K. Fifty-Fifth Pioneer Infantry.

His regiment left Camp Wadsworth, for Port of Embarka- 642tion in August, and in September arrived at Brest, France. Katoski was transferred to Company D, One Hundred and Sixth Infantry, and saw five weeks of active fighting. As the result of his service, he was paralyzed, and rendered helpless in January, 1919. On March 3, 1919, he arrived in New York, and was sent to United States Army General Hospital No. 29, Fort Snelling, Minnesota, from which he was discharged on July 30, 1919. He died on October 29, 1920, at the home of his uncle, Charles Wisocki, 512 North Fifth Street, Duluth.

Paul R. Keehn, who lived in Duluth before entering upon army duties, was the son of Mrs. Lena Keehn, of Mount Clemens, Michigan.

Ambrose Manley Kelley was in business in Duluth before being called to service, being grain clerk for the Kellogg Commission Company of Duluth. He enlisted at Duluth in the early months of the war, on May 25, 1917, joining the Machine Gun Battalion of ‘the Third Minnesota Regiment. Was at Camp Cody, Deming, New Mexico, from August, 1917, until September, 1918, when he left for Port of Embarkation, reaching France in October. He was stationed at La Bozage, Sarthe, France, for some time, and later was at Le Mans, France, where, on February 28, 1919, he died of broncopneumonia.

He was born at Taylor Falls, Minnesota, January 3, 1892, son of J. D. and Mary (Manley) Kelley. His widow, Olivette Kelley lives in Duluth.

Fred Michael Kenney, whose aunt is Mrs. Frank Lesler of Duluth, was born on December 8, 1889, at Detroit, Michigan. By trade he was a granite cutter, and before enlistment was working at his trade in Chicago. It was in Chicago that he was influenced in November, 1916, to enlist, going to Canada for the purpose. He became a member of the Fourth Canadian Reserve Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces, and after this nation joined the Allies, he was assigned to recruiting duties at the British Recruiting Mission’s Chicago headquarters. Later, he returned to Toronto, and there embarked for England. He was in training at Witley, Surrey, for a short while in 1917, but was in the front-line trenches in France, and in action, in that year, meeting death there on August 9, 1917.

Marshall Louvain Knapp, a native Duluthian, popular in West Duluth and an accomplished violinist, died of influenza at Camp Humphries, on September 28, 1918, six months after enlistment. He was born in Duluth on March 9, 1897, son of Jerome M. and Susie H.

Knapp, his mother now living at 17 North Sixty-Second Avenue, West Duluth. His education was obtained at local schools, he eventually graduating from the Denfield High School. Entering business life, he became a clerk in the offices of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway Company, at Duluth, and was an estimable young man of steady refined character. Entering upon military service in March, 1918, he was asigned to duty with Company B, Second Engineering Training Regiment, at Camp Humphries, Virginia. There he died.

Teddy Kovecavich, who was killed in action in France in October, 1918, lived in Chisholm, where his brother, Nick, also lives. Teddy was born at Tisovic, Kalji, Croatia, Jugo-Slavia, on February 16, 1893.

He enlisted in the infantry in May, 1917.

Henry S. Knowlton, who has a place on the Duluth Honor Roll, was in war service long before the United States joined. the Allies.

He enlisted at Winnipeg, Canada, in Company A, Twenty-Seventh Battalion, Canadian Army, and saw much service at the Front before 643he was killed, on May 3, 1917, at Fresney, France. He was born at Superior, Wisconsin, February 1, 1891, the son of Edwin S. and Matilda Knowlton, now of Duluth.

Adam Kucharski, a native Duluthian, was not yet twenty years old when he enlisted at Duluth, in the early months of the war, in the Third Minnesota National Guard. He was assigned to Company C, at Camp Cody, New Mexico, and left with the regiment for France.

He was killed in action on September 5, 1918. His father, Anton Kucharski lives at 316 East Ninth Street, Duluth.

William Henry Lahti was a native of St. Louis County. He was born April 2, 1895, at Soudan, the son of Alexander Lahti, now of Cook, St. Louis County. He reported for military duty in May, 1918, and was assigned to an infantry unit. He served in France.

during the time of greatest stress, and succumbed to influenza on October 6, 1918.

Svante Lampi, who was killed in action in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, was well known in Gilbert, where before entering military service he was a city official. He was of Finnish origin, born in Karvia, Finland, August 22, 1886, son of Alexander Lampi. He entered the U. S. Army on May 24, 1918, at Eveleth. From. there he was sent to Camp Lewis, Washington, and there assigned to the Thirty-Fourth Company, One Hundred and Sixty-Sixth Depot Brigade, Fortieth Division. Six weeks later he was transferred to Camp Kearney, California, but within a month was on the way to France, embarking at Boston on the troopship “Berrima” on August 8, 1918, with Company I, One Hundred and Fiftieth Infantry, Fortieth Division.

On September 25th he was transferred to Company D, One Hundred and Ninth Infantry, Fortieth Division, and was with that unit when he met his death, in action, on October 7, 1918.

Albert P. LaTendress was a Duluthian, and before reporting for military duty lived at 3 West Fifth Street, Duluth.

Lloyd Ernest Le Duc, also a well-known Duluthian, was the son of A. C. LeDuc, of 10 North Twelfth Avenue, east. Lloyd was in the United States Navy.

Fred LePage was known to a large circle in West Duluth, where he lived before enlistment. He left Duluth early in 1918, and was at the Front during about three months of hard fighting. He was killed in action in France on October 8, 1918. A sister, Mrs. J.

LeSarge, lives at 2405 West Sixth Street, Duluth.

Martin Larson lived at 4405 Pitt Street, Duluth, before he enlisted.

August Felix Leppi, son of Andrew Leppi, of Floodwood, was born at Ely, St. Louis County, on December 4, 1895. He entered the army in September, 1917, and for eight months was in training at Camp Pike, Arkansas. He became tubercular, and died of consumption at Floodwood on July 18, 1919.

Rudolph M. Lindquist, of Duluth, was 29 years old when he reported for military duty on July 25, 1918. He was sent to Camp Wadsworth, Spartansburg, S. C., and there assigned to the Fifty-Sixth Pioneer Infantry, then being equipped for overseas duty. The unit left for France soon afterwards, and was hard pressed in the campaigning of that time. Lindquist developed pneumonia, and died in France on September 30, 1918. His widow, Jennie R. Lindquist, lives at 613 East Tenth Street, Duluth.

Frank A. Littlefield, who joined the Canadian Army and was killed at Hennencourt, Belgium, September 28, 1918, was in the 644employ of H. C. Royce, Cramer, Minn., before enlistment. Littlefield was a native of Lowell, Massachusetts, where he was born on April 17, 1895, but for some years had been in Minnesota. He left Duluth in December, 1917, for duty with the Forestry Division of the Canadian Army, and was assigned to the Eighth Battalion. He did not go overseas until early in September, 1918, on the 28th of which month he was killed, being at that time a member of the Fifty- Second Battalion. His mother is Mrs. Emma Royce, 613 East Tenth Street, Duluth.

Allen Lloyd, who was killed in action in France on October 16, 1918, is given place among the Gold Stars of Chisholm, where he lived for some time before entering upon military duties. He was born on December 12, 1890, at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, where his mother, who now is Mrs. James W. Winkler, lives. Lloyd enlisted in September, 1917, and became a member of the Three Hundred and Seventh Engineers.

Victor Loisom was of Eveleth, but more regarding his civil and military record is not available. A brother, Mike, lives at Republic, Washington.

Beio Luiso was also of Eveleth.

Vito Luiso, an Eveleth boy, was killed in action in France.

Frank Lozar, of Ely, was a good loyal American soldier, notwithstanding that he was born in Austria. He died gallantly fighting for his adopted country. He was born on October 22, 1895, at Ritnica, Austria. He lived with his mother in Ely for many years before taking military duty, and was in good business as a storekeeper. He reported for military duty at Ely on September 21, 1917, and was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where he was assigned to Campany A, Three Hundred and Fifty-second Infantry, Second Division. Later, he was transferred to Camp Pike, Arkansas, but eventually crossed the sea, and saw much service at the Front. He was killed in action in France on September 13, 1918, and buried at the St. Mihiel American Cemetery 1233, grave 66, section 16, plot 2, Thiacourt, Meurtheet- Moselle.

Earl Bertram Lozway, of West Duluth, who died in service, was born November 26, 1897, at Sylvan Lake, Crow Wing County, Minnesota.

His mother, Mary A. Lozway, lives at 124 South Twenty- Eighth Avenue, West Duluth, and he was well known in that part of the city. He enlisted in the United States Navy in the first month of war, and died at Philadelphia, where he was stationed, on July 4, 1918.

Fred Luhm, of Duluth, son of W. H. Luhm, of 4229 Gladstone Street, Duluth, was early in national service, enlisting at Duluth in the Ambulance Corps. He was assigned to the Forty-Eighth Ambulance Section, and was killed by a shell while at his duties on the Western front in 1918.

Louis McCahill, who was killed in action on November 7, 1918, is listed with the Duluth men. He was born in 1896, son of James McCahill, and the family lived in Duluth until the death of the father in 1909, when the family removed to Lake City, Minnesota, where Mrs. McCahill still lives.

Arthur W. McCauley was a brave Duluth boy. He was only seventeen years old when, in 1915, he left his home and went to Winnipeg, to enlist in the Canadian Army. His family never saw him again. He was born on July 10, 1898, the son of E. J. McCauley, who now lives at 13 East Superior Street, and as a boy attended 645Jackson School, Duluth. He saw three years of terribly hard service in France, and passed through the severe fighting of 1916 and 1917 without as much as a scratch. Early in 1918, however, he was wounded, and when partially convalescent was sent on recruiting duty to Scotland. That assignment accomplished, however, he was again ordered to France, and was again wounded. That was on July 22, 1918, but the wound was not a serious one and he was soon back in the trenches, only, however, to meet instant death in action on August 8, 1918. He surely served the cause of Liberty to the full.

Edward J. McDermott, eighteen-year-old son of James McDermott, of 2325 West Ninth Street, Duluth, enlisted in the Marine Corps, on April 15, 1918, and died in France on August 10th of that year. Before leaving home he was in the employ of the Duluth Paper and Stationery Company.

Clarence McDonald is listed among those Virginia boys who did not return. His widow, Mrs. Jennie McDonald, now lives in Duluth. McDonald was killed in action in France.

Kenneth Mclnnis, who had lived in Duluth for some years and was in the employ of the Duluth Marine Supply Company, was of Scottish birth, and in October, 1917, enlisted in the Canadian Army.

He crossed the sea in the spring of 1918, and in September, or October, following, was killed in action in France.

Luther McKey was of Duluth, his military papers show.

Frederick Thomas McLain, son of W. D. McLain,.of Kenwood Park, Duluth, enlisted in the United States Navy and was assigned to the U. S. S. “Alabama.” He died of spinal meningitis in 1918.

Douglas McLean was the son of George McLean, of 915 East Fifth Street, Duluth.

Robert McLennan, who died in France in 1918, of wounds received in action, was formerly of Duluth residence, living with his aunt, Mrs. M. C. Littleworth, at 409 Mesaba Avenue. He was assigned to the Chemical Service, and was a member of the First Gas Regiment, American Expeditionary Forces.

Garrick McPhail, of Duluth, was in the Air Service. His mother is Mrs Margaret McPhail, of 821 West Fourth Street.

Kenneth D. MacLeod, of Duluth, was born July 5, 1898, at Rice Lake, Wisconsin, where his mother, Mrs. George MacLeod still lives.

Early in 1917 Kenneth enlisted in the Machine Gun Section of the Third Wisconsin National Guard. He was killed in action in France in October, 1918.

Lloyd O. Magee, city editor of the Eveleth “News” and a popular young man of that city was killed in action in the Argonne Forest, France, on October 1, 1918. He was born on February 11, 1894, in Wisconsin. He reported for military duty on February 28, 1918, and was assigned to an infantry regiment, which soon went overseas. His father, H. M. Magee, lives at Little Falls, Minn.

Anton Maleski left Duluth with the first draft for Camp Dodge, Iowa, in September, 1917. He was assigned to Company E, Fifty- Eighth Infantry, Fourth Division, and was later transferred to Camp Greene. He embarked in May, and safely arrived at London, England, on May 26, 1918, soon afterward crossing the English Channel to France. He was killed in action at Chateau Thierry on July 18, 1918. His brother, John J. Maleski, lives at 621 Central Avenue, Duluth.

646Garrett Mandeville, who was a cadet in the aviation branch of the U. S. Navy at the time he met his death, in August, 1918, by a fall of his seaplane at Pensacola, Florida, enlisted in Minneapolis where he then lived, but he was formerly of Duluth. He was born in Superior, but attended Duluth schools.

Albert Martinson was of Aurora. His sister, Mrs. J. Nassum, lives in Minneapolis.

Nick C. J. Marion went to Canada in 1917 and enlisted in the Canadian Army, being assigned to the Forty-Third Battalion. He was killed in action in France, on August 16, 1918. He was twentynine years old, the son of N. F. Marion, 1 Palmetto Street, Duluth.

Henry Edward Masucci, who was cited for gallantry in action, was a resident in Eveleth before entering the service. He was born on February 23, 1895, at Negaunee, Michigan, son of Mr. and Mrs.

Otis Masucci, and his mother now lives in Eveleth. Henry was called into service on May 26, 1918, at Eveleth, and there enlisted in the infantry, and assigned to the Fortieth Division. He was transferred in September, 1918, to Company I, 305th Infantry, 77th Division, and with that regiment was in action at Argonne Forest, where he was killed by machine-gun fire on October 3d. He distinguished himself in the fighting and was recommended for a medal by his commander.

Jacob Andreas Kristofer Mattson is another of the Gold Stars of Virginia. Born April 18, 1884, at Trondhjem, Norway, he had lived in America for many years before enlisting on June 25, 1918, in the Medical Department of the United States Army. He died of disease while on the voyage to France, death occurring on October 11, 1918. His widow still lives in Virginia, Minnesota.

Samuel Nehemiah Maxwell, of Eveleth, was born on February 24, 1897, the family being well known in Eveleth. He was not called into service until August, 1918, and then assigned to the Motor Transport Corps. He died of influenza at Indianapolis, Indiana, on October 7, 1918.

Oscar A. Melander was a Duluthian by birth, and seemed to have a promising career before him as a dentist. He was born in Duluth on March 1, 1893, son of August H. and Cecelia Melander, now of East Fourth Street. He attended Duluth schools, and in 1912 graduated from the Central High School. He proceeded to the University of Minnesota, and was still an undergraduate when war came in 1917. He joined the Student Corps of the University of Minnesota when that was organized and became a sergeant of it.

Very soon after graduating, as a dentist in 1918, he decided to enlist in the regular army, and did so on June 14, 1918, at St. Paul, Minnesota, as a private of the aviation branch. He was assigned to the Air Service Mechanical School, at St. Paul, and at that establishment was detailed to the medical section, because of his professional training.

He was soon expecting examination for commission in the army when sickness intervened. Stricken with influenza, he was removed to the army hospital, Overland Building, St. Paul, and there died on October 11, 1918. Thus ended long preparations for a useful professional life.

Arthur A. Mellin, a Duluth boy who was killed in action within sixteen days of landing in France, was born in Duluth, October 22, 1897, the son of Alexander and Ida Mellin, now of 1719 West New Street. He was interested in soldiering long before the nation became involved in the European struggle, and as a member of the Third Minnesota Infantry, of the National Guard, went to the Mexican 647Border, in 1916 when the country was virtually at war with Mexico.

In civil life, he was a typewriter mechanic, and was with the Remington Typewriter Company, Duluth. In June, 1917, he enlisted for World War service. He belonged to Company C of the Third Minnesota Infantry, Thirty-fourth Division and was at Camp Cody, New Mexico, until June, 1918, then leaving for Camp Merritt, New Jersey, where he remained until July 12th, when he embarked for Europe with the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, to Company C of which he had been transferred while still at Camp Cody.

He left Camp Cody as a machine gun casual. Almost immediately after debarking in France, he was transferred to Company K of the One Hundred and Sixty-third Infantry, and went into the front-line trenches in the Argonne within four days of landing. He was killed in the Argonne Forest early in August, 1918.

William G. Messner, who made the Supreme Sacrifice, was a son of Jake B. Messner, of Hibbing.

Edward F. Mettner was born in Duluth on September 16, 1890, son of Edward Mettner, now of 5723 Avondale Street, Duluth. He died of influenza at Camp Edgewood, Maryland, October 10, 1918.

Sigurd Peter Moe, of McKinley, was one of the outstanding heroes of the early days of American participation in the fighting on the Western front. He was in the Marine Corps, and was killed in the memorable engagement at Belleau Wood on June 12, 1918, and because of his bravery in that engagement, the French Government honored his memory by awarding him the Croix de Guerre. The report shows that Sigurd Moe and another marine, Willis Shoemaker, left a shelter trench during heavy bombardment to rescue a wounded comrade. Moe was killed in the attempt.

Walter Monett, of Duluth, was nineteen years old when he met his death of wounds in France in October, 1918. He was born in Duluth and enlisted at Duluth on July 26, 1917. He was sent to Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and assigned to Company H, First Minnesota Infantry, later going to Camp Cody, New Mexico and overseas in June, 1918, with the Twelfth Casual Company. He died of wounds on October 6, 1918. His father is Amos Monett, of 280 Third Avenue, East, Duluth.

Harvey H. Morey was of Eveleth; a sister, Mrs. William Hein, lives at Jonesboro, Arkansas. Morey was killed in action in France, August 1, 1918.

William H. Morrison, who was killed in action in France in September or October, 1918, was a Duluthian. His sister, Miss Agatha M., lives at 1815 West Superior Street.

Michael J. Murphy, whose home was in Sioux City, Iowa, will be remembered by Duluth people. He was a sergeant of Marines, and was in charge of recruiting for the United States Marine Corps in Duluth; also, he was captain of the Duluth Marine Scouts. After leaving Duluth, he was stationed for a time at Quantico, Virginia, but soon assigned to service abroad. He was killed in action in France in August, 1918.

John J. Mustar, of Gilbert, succumbed to pneumonia, following influenza, at Camp Eustis, Virginia, on October 13, 1918. He had been in service for ten months, having enlisted at Gilbert on December 16, 1917, in Battery C, Forty-ninth Regiment. He was born in Biwabik, April 11, 1896, but lived for many years in Gilbert latterly, being in the employ of the Gilbert Hardware Company for some time before enlistment. His mother, Maria Mustar, still lives in Gilbert.

648Arthur Nelson was of Prosit, Minnesota.

Charles G. Nelson was the son of Gust Nelson of Soudan.

Edward G. Nelson of Duluth died June, 1919. His sister is Mrs.

Edward Peterson, 917 East Tenth Street, Duluth.

Max Neubauer, son of Florien’ Newbauer, of Ninety-second Avenue, West, and Grand, Duluth, departed from Duluth with the first detachment drafted in September, 1917. He went overseas and died of wounds in France in July, 1918, at first being reported: “Missing in action.” Carl Oscar Niemi belonged to a well-known and respected Eveleth family. He was born on July 28, 1894, at Tower, St. Louis County, son of Oscar Niemi. Carl attended the first Officers’ Training Camp, at Fort Snelling, in June, 1917, and after a two months’ course was commissioned second lieutenant, and assigned to the Air Service. He soon went overseas, and as an aviator did valuable and dangerous work along the Western front during the severe fighting in 1918. He also was for a time on the Italian front. When the Armistice came, he was on the French front, and soon afterwards was under orders to return home. The orders were rescinded and he continued to do reconnaissance work with his organization and met his death as the result of a mid-air collision of aeroplanes. He was buried in an American cemetery in France with the honors customarily tendered an aviatbr.

Gilbert Winsford Nordman, who was killed in action at Cote de Chatillon, France, October 16, 1918, had lived in Duluth for many years with his parents, Julius and Jennie Nordman of 221 East Fifth Street. Gilbert was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on Ndvember 17, 1894, and by trade was an auto mechanic. He was employed by the Central Auto Company, Duluth, before enlistment, Which took place on September 5, 1917, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was sent to Camp Custer, Michigan, and there assigned to the Thirty-second Company, One Hundred and Sixtieth Depot Brigade, Eighth Battalion.

He arrived at St. Nazaire, France, on March 6, 1918, and was in action at Badonvillers four days later. He saw considerable fighting during the following six months in Champagne, at St. Mihiel, Aisne, Meuse, Argonne.

James Novak, of Virginia, was a Bohemian by birth, but evidently seriously affected by the state of war in Europe. He went to Canada and enlisted in the Canadian army long before the United States became involved in the war. He, however, appears to have been transferred to the United States army in May, 1918, at his request. During that summer, he was at Fort Brady, Michigan, and during the epidemic of Spanish Influenza he contracted the disease and died on October 16, 1918, at that fort. His father is Frank Novak, of Greaney.

Erick Ofsted was of Duluth. He enlisted at Duluth, in April, 1918, and eventually became a member of Company F, of the Three Hundred and Eighty-fifth Infantry, with which unit he sailed for France in July, 1918. He was reported, “Missing in action.” Axel William Olson was a Duluthian, his mother being Mrs.

Alice Olson of East First Street.

Chester Norman Olson lived at Cresson before enlistment. His nearest relative in America seems to have been Mrs. H. C. Hess, of Phelps, Wisconsin.

Ernest R. Olson was a Duluthian, his widow, Mabel Olson, living at 216 South Sixty-third Avenue, west, Duluth.

649 0 0 0 H o Q z H o t 0 U? W Q a V £; b I X cn > Uw H H 0 P ^ QJohn R. Olson, a Norwegian by birth, followed the trade of painter in Duluth before entering the service in May, 1918. He lived at 2422 West Seventh Street, Duluth, before reporting for duty. His military record covers four months of service at Camp Dodge, Iowa, where on October 15, 1918, he died of pneumonia. His body was returned to Duluth and buried with military honors. He had no relatives in America, but his mother, in Norway, survives him.

Fred Ostrom, of Eveleth, was gassed at the front, and later died of influenza. His remains now lie at Negaunee, Michigan Cemetery.

John Leo Ossowski was the son of John Ossowski, of 2830 North Hudson Avenue, Duluth.

David Livingston Page, of Duluth, enlisted early in 1917 in the Third Minnesota Infantry, Thirty-fourth Division. Later, he was transferred to the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, of the same division. He died while on the voyage overseas, and was buried in England. His mother is Mrs. Mary Page, of 1001 Twelfth Avenue, West, Duluth.

Albin F. Palmer, of Duluth, was the son of C. A. Palmer, of Chisago City, Minnesota. Albin was called to military duty on May 25, 1918, and went overseas with the Seventy-seventh Division.

He was killed in action on the French’ front on October 4, 1918.

When in Duluth he lived at 2316 West Second Street.

Mervin Palmer was a brother of Albin.

John Paul Parker, who was well-known in Gilbert, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 20; 1888. He enlisted almost as soon as this country entered into the struggle in April, 1917, and was with one of the units early in France. He was killed in action at the Aisne River, France, July 20, 1918, and was buried in the American Area Cemetery, Row C, Grave 76, Commune Lecharmiel, Aisne territory.

Otto Pazari, of Eveleth, was killed in action in France.

John Perone lived at 1408 Gary Street, West, Duluth, before entering upon military duties.

Andrew Peterson, of Cotton, Minnesota, was the son of Peter Peterson, of same town. He was born in Norway, January 24, 1890.

He enlisted on September 20, 1917, and was assigned to Company E, of the Fifty-eighth Infantry, which was sent to France in time to take part in the supreme effort made by the Allies after the July, 1918, drive of the Germans had spent itself. Andrew took part in the counter-offensive, but was killed on the second or third day of the great French counter-offensive which was destined to bring to the Allies a triumphant issue. Andrew Peterson is recorded as having been killed on July 18th.

Atry Peterson, of Eveleth, died of pneumonia on September 25, 1918. His remains were brought to Virginia, Minnesota, for interment.

August Peterson was the son of Nels G. Peterson, of Biwabik, and was born on May 23, 1892, at St. Ignace, Michigan. On July 27, 1917, he enlisted in the artillery and was assigned to Battery B, One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Heavy Field Artillery, Thirty-fourth Division.

He went overseas and died of influenza at Liverpool, England, on October 15, 1918.

Axel Rudolph Peterson was a native-born Duluthian, son of Oscar R. Peterson, of 912 North Fifty-seventh Avenue, West. He was educated chiefly in Duluth schools, and was a steady boy, of exemplary habits, never having smoked. He was also a teetotaler, 651and was earnest in his endeavor to succeed in life. He received license as assistant druggist at the age of twenty, and had it not been for the national situation early in 1917, would probably soon have secured thre major license. He was twenty-one years old when he enlisted, in June, 1917, and was assigned to the medical detachment of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, going with the regiment to Camp Cody, New Mexico. There he died a year later, on June 2, 1918, of pneumonia.

Carl William Peterson was the son of August W. Peterson, 5632 West Eighth Street, Duluth.

Ernest O. Peterson, also of Duluth, was brother of Arthur W.

Peterson, 2702 West Third Street, Duluth.

Harold Peterson, brother of Mrs. Carl Olson, 427 Forty-third Avenue, West, Duluth, lived in Duluth before the war came.

Helmer A. Peterson was born in Duluth, and was well-known.

He was born January 23, 1894, son of John and Hannah Peterson, and his academic schooling was obtained in Duluth schools. He became a pharmacist and in that capacity was employed at Beyers Drug Store, Duluth, for some time before reporting for military duty on September 21, 1917. He was sent from Duluth to Camp Dodge, Iowa, and assigned to the Medical Corps, 350th F. A., 313th Sanitary Train. At Camp Dodge he remained for the winter and would probably have gone overseas in 1918 had he not succumbed to disease at Camp Dodge, on April 10, 1918. His mother now lives at 119 East Third Street, Duluth.

Henning O. Peterson lived at 520 West Superior Street, Duluth, before entering the army. His brother, Arvid lives in Chicago.

Rudolph Peterson was the son of Oscar R. Peterson, of 912 North Fifty-seventh Avenue, West, Duluth. Rudolph worked in Duluth before entering the service.

Elia Peteruka was of Duluth residence prior to the war, but appears to have no relatives in Minnesota. His brother, Gust Peteruka, is at Fort Morgan, Colorado.

John Pitich was one of the boys from Buhl.

John H. Pluth was of Ely, where his mother, who is now Mrs.

Anna Matiehick, lives.

Neno Molidro lived at Aurora, his papers state.

George E. Porthan, of Ely, was the son of John E. Porthan, of that place. Porthan was killed in action in France.

Mott Prelbich was also of Ely; his father is John Prelbich.

Louis Press lived at Chisholm before leaving for military service.

His brother, Samuel, lives at Eveleth, at 705 Hayes Street. Louis was born August 17, 1891, at Trovi, Russia, but had lived in the United States for many years before the war. He was enlisted in February, 1918, and went overseas with an infantry regiment. He was killed in action in France on August 15, 1918.

Clyde E. Prudden, who became a major of the Medical Corps, United States army and was much respected by the men of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Field Artillery, was a well-known and successful physician of Duluth before the state of war into which the nation became in 1917 so radically changed the course of the lives of so many of its worthiest citizens. Major Prudden was born in Duluth, and attended local schools. For the medical course he proceeded to Northwestern University, from which he graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, with the class of 1909. In 1912 he was an associate of Dr. C. A. Stewart, in practice in Duluth, and 652later with Drs. Bagby, Kohagan and Gillespie. He was for many years interested in military affairs, and in peace time was a member of the old Third Minnesota Infantry. He went with the regiment to Fort Snelling, and when it was converted from an infantry to a field artillery unit, he was advanced in rank and made senior officer of the Medical Detachment at the Base Hospital. Within a short time, he was again promoted and became major. Eventually, he became senior major of the Regimental Medical Detachment of the One Hundred Twenty-fifth Field Artillery. From August, 1917, to the autumn of the following year, he was with the regiment at Fort Deming, New Mexico. In September, the regiment went overseas and during the voyage Major Prudden developed pneumonia, from which he died before the regiment debarked.

Doctor Prudden was married in Oklahoma City in January, 1918, and a child was born to his widow five or six months after his death.

Both widow and child, however, met a tragic death, being drowned in the tidal wave that swept Corpus Christie, on September 14, 1919.

The body of Major Prudden was returned to the United States in October, 1920. It was received in Duluth on November 1, 1920, and reinterred on American soil in his native city, with full military honors and with many other indications of the respect in which his memory is held by people of Duluth. His father is A. E. Prudden, of 3501 Minnesota Avenue.

Otto Pusarim, another of the soldiers of Ely who gave national service to the full, was the son of Matt Pusarim of Ely.

Howard C. Quigley, who was killed in action in the Argonne Forest, France, November 4, 1918, was a native of Duluth, born in the city July 18, 1894, the son of James R. Quigley, now of 123 Minneapolis Avenue, Duluth. Young Quigley passed through the Duluth schools, and was with the American Bridge Company, Duluth, when called into service on April 26, 1918, at Duluth. As a private of infantry, he was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, and became a member of Company D, Three Hundred and Sixtieth Infantry, Ninetieth Division, going to Camp Travis, Texas, within three weeks of reaching Camp Dodge. In June, 1918, his regiment embarked at Hoboken and was soon in action in France. Quigley was present at St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne major offensives, being killed in the Argonne within a week of the signing of the armistice.

William Henry Reddy, of Biwabik, was in the United States navy, and had the rating of baker, 2cl. His mother is Mrs. Mary Reddy, of Biwabik.

Frank Reed, of Arnold, was born in Duluth on July 27, 1897, son of Mike Reed, of Arnold, R. F. D. No. 4, Duluth. Ne was a smart, well-developed boy, and when enlisted, on March 30, 1918, was assigned to the cavalry branch of the United States army, and sent to the Mexican border. He died of pneuomnia at El Paso, New Mexico, December 8, 1918, pneumonia developing at a time when he was somewhat weakened, owing to inaction that followed a fall from a horse while on patrol.

Charles C. Ringler was of Duluth prior to entering upon military duties. He was in the Chemical Service of the United States army, as chemist, and died at the United States Marine Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, on November 22, 1918. His mother, who now is Mrs. Philip Allendorfer, lives in Chicago.

Albert Carl Robertson, who died of wound, was a Duluthian, born in the city on April 21, 1894, son of Charles and Hedvig Rob- Vol. II–10 653ertson, now of 2516 West Twelfth Street, Duluth. He also was a married man at the time of entering the army, and was employed at the Great Northern Power Plant. Enlisted at Duluth on June 28, 1918, he left that day for Camp Grant, and was there assigned to Company I, Four Hundred and Thirty-first Infantry. He was transferred in August to Company D of Three Hundred and Tenth Infantry and left for Port of Embarkation early in September. After a short stay at Camp Upton, New York, he embarked at New York, September 8th, and arrived in France on September 25th. He was in action on October 7th, at Bois de Loges, Argonne Forest, and from that time until he was wounded on October 18th, he was almost continuously in action. He died in hospital in France on November 5, 1918.

William L. Robideau before the war lived at 123 Astor Street, Duluth.

Yalmer Leonard Saari, of Virginia and Duluth, was born October 27, 1895, at Calumet, Houghton County, Michigan. His widow, Hulda Saari now lives at 540 West Fourth Street, Duluth. Saari reported for enlistment on April 28, 1918, and at Camp Dodge, Iowa, to which cantonment he was sent, he was assigned to Company D, Three Hundred and’ Fifty-eighth Infantry. Two months later he was on the way overseas; and on September 26th, 1918, he was killed by machine gun fire, in an attack on the Hindenburg Line in France.

Piotre Sagotowski, whose papers show that he formerly had Duluth residence, was a Russian, his father, Piotre, at Wytxamers, St. Kawno, Russia.

Christ O. Sandwich, who was a sawyer in the mill of J. P. Pfeiffer, Iverson, Minnesota, and lived in Duluth, where his widow still lives, was a Norwegian by birth, born in Gubbiansdalen, Norway, December 15, 1894. He was called into service on June 28, 1918, at Carlton, Minnesota, and sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, where he was assigned to the Three Hundred and Forty-first Infantry, a regiment of the Eighty-sixth Division. Soon afterwards he was transferred to Company D, Three Hundred and Eighth Machine Gun Battalion, Seventy- eighth Division. In August he left for an eastern camp, preparatory to going overseas and left Camp Upton, New York, September 8th, embarking then. He received promotion to the grade of corporal during the voyage. He first went into action at Verdun on October 12, 1918, and was fighting on that front until the 19th, when he received a shrapnel wound and was also gassed. The shrapnel wounds were not serious, but the gas set up a lingering illness. Finally, he died of tubercular meningitis, at the American Base Hospital, Brest, France, May 29, 1919.

Thomas B. Shaughnessy lived at Morgan Park prior to enlisting.

He was born at Minneapolis, Minnesota, April 27, 1891, son of James P. and Ellen Shaughnessy, who now live at Mbrgan Park, Duluth. Thomas B. by trade was a structural ironworker and was with the Universal Portland Cement Company. He was a young man of grit, and earnest patriotic purpose, as he showed when called upon to report for military duty. He had received notice to report at Duluth on February 26, 1918, and on that morning sprained his ankle. But he refused to be left behind by the detachment then departing, so he was taken to the station in an auto, and upon arrival at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, was placed in hospital, where he remained for ten days. Following that, he was in a detention camp for seventeen days and was given ten days of intensive drilling, and 654then sent on to the port of embarkation. It was at the time of the breaking of the British front in France during the great spring drive of the Germans. Shaughnessy was on the British front in May, 1918, and in a Belgian sector. In June, he was in the Vosges Mountains.

He was at St. Mihiel September 12th and from September 26 to October 2 was in the terrible fighting in the Argonne Forest, and later in the Meuse sector, five miles south of Verdun. He passed through the terrible fighting without hurt, but while waiting for home orders, he was taken sick and pneumonia developing he died at Base Hospital, No. 9, Bazoilles, France, on February 7, 1919.

Willard Shea, of Eveleth, succumbed to pneumonia in an American camp on September 25, 1918. His body was brought to Eveleth for burial.

Joseph Shepatz was of Virginia, son of John Shepatz of that place.

James Shannon, of Virginia, had a distinguished military career.

He was the son of the late C. E. Shannon, of Duluth, and brother of Mrs. Harry Sleepack, of 2419 East Fourth Street, and had passed through West Point, having been appointed to that military academy by Judge Page Morris, then congressman from this district. He was killed in France in 1918, having attained the grade of lieutenantcolonel and a place on the staff of General Pershing, in France.

Geofge E. Sigel, who is listed as a volunteer from Virginia, was a native of Duluth, born there on June 28, 1900. The family, however, has lived in Virginia for many years, and the boy was in school there.

In fact, he volunteered in his senior high-school year and was graduated by proxy, with seven others who received diplomas. He enlisted on May 25, 1918, and became a member of Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Engineers, with which regiment he went overseas. He passed through the exciting latter half of 1918, but in February, 1919, suffered from bronchitis, at Brest, France, from which he never recovered. He returned to this country and was sent to Fort Bayard, New Mexico, his lungs having become affected.

He died there on June 14, 1919, of tuberculosis. “A serious, rightliving, clean-minded young man,” Father J. O’Brien, army chaplain at Fort Bayard testified of him.

Matt Smuky, who made the Supreme Sacrifice, lived in McKinley before the war.

Mike Simney, of Duluth, was the son of Albert Simney, of 2631 West Fifth Street, Duluth, and was a member of the first detachment of Duluth manhood called into service under the Selective Draft. They left Duluth in September, 1917, for Camp Grant. Simney eventually saw much service in France. He was in the Engineers and on October 6, 1918, succumbed to wounds received in action.

Otto Smuland, son of Christian Smuland, Bangsund, Namdalen, Norway, and brother of Helmar Smuland, of 504 East Fourteenth Street, Duluth, was in the fishery business at Isle Royale before he was selected to give military service. He was twenty-eight years old when enlisted on July 25, 1918, at Duluth. He left at once for Camp Wadsworth, Spartansburg, South Carolina, and there was assigned to an infantry regiment. He died at Camp Wadsworth in August, 1918. Funeral services were held on August 28, 1918, at Bethesda Norwegian Lutheran Church, Duluth, following the return of the body to Duluth under military escort.

Anthony Snider was of Tower, although, unfortunately, more regarding his life and military service is now not available.

655Peter Stark lived in Eveleth before going into the service. He was killed in action in France on November 7, 1918, only four days before hostilities ceased. His body lies in an American cemetery in France. His brother is Michael Stark, of McKinley.

Edward F. Snyder, who is on the Duluth list of gold stars, lived in that city for about two years before enlisting, although he was a native of Buffalo, New York. He enlisted in June, 1917, and was for more than a year on the Western battle line, France. He joined a Canadian regiment and was killed in action in 1918. He married Ruth Berglund, of West Duluth, in 1916.

Philip Steen, who enlisted at Duluth in August, 1917, and became a member of an artillery unit, died on the way over to France, on or about July 10, 1918. He was born in Duluth, and his father, John Steen, now lives at 510 Third Avenue, east.

Albert C. Steiner, also a Duluthian by birth, owned and worked a farm in St. Louis County before enlisting. He was born on November 25, 1891, and he reported for military duty on May 25, 1918, at Duluth. He was assigned to Company L, One Hundred and Fiftyninth Infantry, Fortieth Division, at Camp Lewis, Washington. On June 29th he was transferred to Camp Kearney, California, and in August at that camp was transferred to Company E, Three Hundred and Seventh Infantry, with which regiment he embarked, after a period of preparation at Camp Nills, Long Island, New York. The regiment arrived in France before the end of August and was rushed to the front. Steiner was killed in action on November 4, 1918, and was buried in the Commune of Pierremont, Ardennes, France. Albert Steiner’s brother, Fred, lives at 9 West Second Street, Duluth.

Ola H. Strand was of Virginia.

Pedro Stuppa also lived in Virginia before the war. His sister is Mrs. James Hogan, of Virginia.

Clarence B. Sundquist, of Duluth, son of Clarence B. Sundquist, of Palo (R. D. Box No. 72), Minnesota, was born November 12, 1895, in Superior. He was enlisted at Duluth, as a private of the Signal Corps, Air Service, and was assigned to Company C, Three Hundred and Twenty-third Field Service Battalion at Camp Funston.

Later, he was at Camp Stanley, Texas, but eventually embarked for foreign service at New York, sailing on the United States transport Leviathan,” which arrived at Brest, France, on September 28, 1918.

Sundquist developed pneumonia while at Brest and died there on October 11, 1918. At that time he held the grade of corporal. The body was exhumed in 1920 and returned to this country, eventually reaching Duluth. Burial service was held on July 21st, former comrades firing the last salute over his grave at Park Hill Cemetery, Duluth. The funeral ceremonies were held under the auspices of the Duluth post of the American Legion.

Leslie Severt Swanman, who was a shipping clerk with the Knudson Fruit Company, Duluth, before enlisting, was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on December 12, 1892. Duluth has been the home of the family for a long time and his mother still lives there, at 915 North Seventh Avenue, East. Leslie was enlisted at Duluth on May 25, 1918, and sent to Camp Lewis, Washington, where he was assigned to Company L, One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Infantry, Fortieth Division.

On July 25th he was transferred to Camp Kearney and there transferred to the Three Hundred and Twenty-fourth Infantry,, Eighty-first Division. On August 20th he embarked at New York and made quick passage to Liverpool, eventually reaching France.

656He was in front-line trenches in the Vosges Mountains; was present in the battle of St. Mihiel, and passed through terrible fighting in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. On November 10, 1918, just one day before the signing of the Armistice, he was wounded in action at Haudimont, and died of those wounds twelve days later, on November 22. 1918.

Edward B. Swanson lived at Saginaw, Minnesota, son of Ben Swanson, of that place.

Wallace J. Taylor was of Virginia, where his mother still is.

Olaf Ugstad, of Duluth, was born October 3, 1891, at Hurum, Buskruds County, Norway, but has been in America for many years.

At one time he was employed by the Wilson Contracting Company, Duluth, and later was foreman at the St. Louis County Work Farm.

He was enlisted into the United States army in January, 1918, and assigned to the Spruce Production Section of the Forestry Division.

He was accidentally killed at Emuclaw, Washington, on August 2, 1918. The body was returned to Duluth for burial. A brother is Reginald Ugstad, of Hermanstown.

Fiori Valbiter, a resident in Virginia before the war, was born in Rome, Italy, and at the time of enlistment in 1918 was twentyseven years old. He died at Detroit, Michigan.

Haralebes Vasilion was of Hibbing.

Florent Van de Perre also was of Hibbing.

Peter Verdi made his home in Eveleth before entering the service, but was born at Agri, Italy, on May 2, 1897. He was a married man at time of enlistment, and his wife, Lydia, still lives in Eveleth.

Peter left for military duty on May 17, 1918, and went to France with an infantry regiment. He was killed in action in France on November 1, 1918.

Leander Waillin, lived at Sandy, Minnesota, where his father, Tom Waillin, has a farm. The family is Finnish, and Leander was born in Finland on September 8, 1886. He was included in the second Duluth draft for the National Army, but was destined not to go overseas. During the epidemic of Spanish Influenza which swept through the home cantonments in the autumn of 1918, Waillin contracted the disease, and died on November 10, 1918, being then at Camp Kearney, California.

Aino Nicanor Wene was a stalwart agricultural pioneer of Buyck, St. Louis County. He was developing an acreage of wild land near Buyck when called into service in September, 1917. He was assigned to the Corps of Engineers and ultimately reached France, where he was killed in action on October 15, 1918. His sister, Mrs. Niemi Ahlgren, lives in Buyck, but the Wene family is of Finnish origin, Aino was born at Rauma, Finland, January 10, 1892.

Philip T. White was of Ely, son of Harry E. White, of that place.

Arthur Charles Williams was a native of Hibbing, although the family lived at Kinney at the time he enlisted. He was born on December 26, 1898, and lived on the Ranges practically all’ his life, his father having been connected with mining operations on the Range for almost a generation. He, William Williams, latterly has been blacksmith in the shops of the Oliver Iron Mining Company at Hibbing. The son was not yet twenty years old when, on August 5, 1918, he enlisted in the Medical Department of the United States army. He was almost immediately assigned to overseas duty and soon after landing in France was taken sick, pneumonia developing.

657He died at Brest on September 26, 1918, and was there buried. In 1920, however, his body was returned to the United States and arrived at Virginia on June 12, 1920. Burial took place in the part of Virginia Cemetery set apart to mark the last resting place of its World War heroes who made the Supreme Sacrifice.

David Gilbert Wisted, in whose honor the Duluth post of the American Legion was named, was born in Duluth on September 13, 1893. In the early days of the war, he was a clerk with the United States Food Administration, but he enlisted in the Marine Corps on December 14, 1917, at Paris Isle. He was assigned to the Eightysecond Company and for a time was stationed at Paris Isle and Quantico, Virginia. On February 24, 1918, he was transferred to the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Company, Replacement Battalion, and later to the Sixth Marines, embarking at Philadelphia on March 12th, 1918. Debarking at Brest on April 1, 1918, the Marines were soon at the front and were destined to bring glory to their country, in the part they took in the fighting at Chateau Thierry and Belleau Wood in May and June of that vital year. Wisted was killed in action at Belleau Wood. on June 3, 1918, being instantly killed by a high-explosive shell. His father, Iver Wisted, lives at 1201 East Fourth Street, Duluth.

John Oscar Wuori is listed with the men from Duluth, but he lived in Gilbert for some time prior to enlistment. He was a Finn, born at Pomarkku, Finland, March 9, 1888. He reported for duty on August 8, 1918, and was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where he was assigned to Company Thirty, One Hundred and Sixty-third Depot Brigade. He died of pneumonia in that camp on October 8, 1918.

As will be appreciated from a reading of the foregoing some of these men had wide accomplishments and definite capability, some were worthy tillers of the soil and some were industrious workers in commercial affairs of St. Louis County. But all were patriots; and the names of all who have been inscribed on the great national Roll of Honor, there to remain for as long as the great republic lasts. And for as long as there is a County of St. Louis, Minnesota, for so long will these of her sons be willingly and deservedly accorded the place of honor in any comprehensive review of the County’s part in the Great World War.

Sources:

  • Van Brunt, Walter, ed. Duluth and St. Louis County, Minnesota Vols. 1 – 3. The American Historical Society. Chicago: 1922.
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